Author Topic: Saturday 14 January 7-by-many puzzle  (Read 181 times)

ridethetalk

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Saturday 14 January 7-by-many puzzle
« on: January 15, 2023, 03:27:46 PM »
CABLESS - not having a driver's cabin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%E2%80%93unit
 
BACKABLE - that which can or should be backed; often used in financial or venture capital circles to describe a good investment https://glosbe.com/en/en/backable

BALLSACK - vulgar expression for the scrotum

I've noticed that, in games where "less" and "able" compound words can be formed, I find my hit rate takes a hit from trying possible options that Chi doesn't recognise... 😥😥😥
The greenest watt ever produced is the one you never use. Playing as jk1956 and John is my name.
When we come out of the Covid-19 crisis, we need to make sure recovery efforts address the Climate Crisis (which can't be solved using social distancing!)

Alan W

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Re: Saturday 14 January 7-by-many puzzle
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2023, 01:35:31 PM »
I didn't see cabless in any dictionary other than Wiktionary, but it is used occasionally. And its use may become more frequent with the development of driverless vehicles. An example from the Diesel Progress website of the KHL Group:

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The cabless design of the company’s Pod electric autonomous trucks required NHTSA approval for public on-road operation.

I'll accept it as a rare word.
Alan Walker
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Alan W

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Re: Saturday 14 January 7-by-many puzzle
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2023, 01:40:52 PM »
Backable is another word that seems to be in Wiktionary only. This word is often used in relation to horse racing and other sports betting contexts. An instance of a different context was in the Australian Financial Review in March last year:

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And Ukraine's successes will persuade more Western politicians that they have a backable cause, bringing more arms as well as sympathy.

I'll add it as a rare word.
Alan Walker
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Alan W

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Re: Saturday 14 January 7-by-many puzzle
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2023, 01:57:13 PM »
Ballsack is identified by Wiktionary as an alternate form of ball sack, meaning either a scrotum or an obnoxious person.

The word seems to be in occasional use in most English speaking lands. From a quick survey, I'd say it's most often written as two words when used of the male anatomy, and more likely as a single word when used as an insult.

Oddly enough it's not known by Green's Dictionary of Slang, but it is in the OED. The earliest occurrence known to the OED, as two words, was in 1974. For an objectionable person, it was first recorded in 1991. An example from the 2003 book Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War:

Quote
I've been hearing funny rumors ... that the marine's family is more important than the Marine Corps. The ballsacks who say that are liars and possibly Communists.

I'll add it as a rare word.
Alan Walker
Creator of Lexigame websites

ridethetalk

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Re: Saturday 14 January 7-by-many puzzle
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2023, 05:00:53 PM »
Thanks, thanks and thanks, Alan...

As usual your critiques are nothing if not educational...  :angel: :angel: :angel:
The greenest watt ever produced is the one you never use. Playing as jk1956 and John is my name.
When we come out of the Covid-19 crisis, we need to make sure recovery efforts address the Climate Crisis (which can't be solved using social distancing!)

Jacki

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Re: Saturday 14 January 7-by-many puzzle
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2023, 04:11:45 PM »
You know I think it’s kind of funny that cause someone mentions a word in a book or print or the like that it gives it validity. We have all sorts of made-up family words we use but I dare say they are not words. Like PAGS - rolled up cuffs on pants that are too long and EPI - short for elephant. Also I have been know to call my husband some names that I don’t think exist yet!! I know you’re just using it as an extra source for validity for inclusion, it just strikes me as ironic that because someone wrote it down, it’s valid. But then I suppose that’s how all words start at some point, like SELFIE.
Autumn in Canberra