Author Topic: an unusual Christmas  (Read 313 times)

a non-amos

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an unusual Christmas
« on: January 06, 2020, 03:02:26 PM »
A friend's knee gave out on Christmas Eve.  Nobody wants to spend Christmas Eve in the emergency room, but stuff happens.

Since then she has not been able to get around very well, at first not even able to make a PBJ.  I have shown up every now and then to deliver some home cooking and do some chores and errands.  Take out the trash.  Post some letters.  Whatever needs be.

Her friend and neighbor Pam has helped immensely.  Pam is the real "feet on the ground" with continual help and companionship. 

This evening I showed up (again) with more food, and Pam asked "What, you have a chef that cooks for you and brings you free food?"  I told her that's about right, and would she like some?  I brought plenty.  By the way, how did you like the shrimp Creole?

After that I proceeded to deliver the rest of the food to people who don't make enough income to make ends meet.

In my book, this is the heart and soul of the Christmas Spirit.  Generosity, giving, and being mindful of others' needs.

It was a good Christmas.

- A
Carpe digitus.
(Roughly translated, this is possibly the world's oldest "pull my finger" joke)

birdy

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Re: an unusual Christmas
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2020, 05:23:19 PM »
I like your interpretation of the Christmas Spirit, a non-amos, though I suspect a more general example, good for the entire year, is the Good Samaritan.

a non-amos

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Re: an unusual Christmas
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2020, 04:00:52 PM »
If the compassion and generosity of the Good Samaritan and the giving and charitable spirit of Christmas are not considered one and the same, maybe they should be?

Please also consider that the officially recognized date of Christmas has been twiddled with so much that we now confuse the beginning of winter with the middle of spring.  The date is irrelevant.  What we do is highly relevant, no matter the date.

Yes, it would be horrible for the Christmas shopping season to last throughout the year.  Can you imagine the credit card bills?  When would those carols ever stop?  How would Santa take off, when his sleigh is bogged down in the springtime mud?  Maybe if he had a monster truck . . .

- A
Carpe digitus.
(Roughly translated, this is possibly the world's oldest "pull my finger" joke)

yelnats

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Re: an unusual Christmas
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2020, 06:14:58 PM »
Quote
How would Santa take off, when his sleigh is bogged down in the springtime mud?

Santa is very resourceful. He is able to visit little kids in the southern hemisphere in the middle of summer in a lightweight red suit. 40°Celsius (110°F) is not unknown for Christmas day.

mkenuk

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Re: an unusual Christmas
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2020, 03:31:29 AM »
Santa in a lightweight red suit. .

Actually the real spirit of the Yule, the Ghost of Christmas Present, as he appears in A Christmas Carol is dressed in green.

Beware of cheap imitations!

Ozzyjack

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Re: an unusual Christmas
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2020, 03:55:33 AM »
I am not sure whether it is appropriate to wish people who celebrate Christmas on 7 January a “Merry Christmas “.

So I will just say - I hope the day and the season is everything that you wish it to be and is deeply satisfying for you.
Cheers, Jack


“In victory, you deserve Champagne. In defeat you need it.”  ― Napoleon Bonaparte

TRex

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Re: an unusual Christmas
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2020, 08:30:49 AM »
I am not sure whether it is appropriate to wish people who celebrate Christmas on 7 January a “Merry Christmas “.

So I will just say - I hope the day and the season is everything that you wish it to be and is deeply satisfying for you.

Although there is a specific greeting & response used between Orthodox Christians for Christmas (as there is for Pascha/Easter), we do wish one another 'Merry Christmas' (in English-speaking lands!!), so thank you!