Author Topic: raspberries etc.  (Read 295 times)

a non-amos

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raspberries etc.
« on: November 15, 2019, 05:07:15 PM »
This spring we had a bumper crop of wild raspberries.  Seriously, every bit of roadside with a vacant lot was overflowing with them. An embarrassment of riches!

I mentioned this at the pub and the server said she did not like raspberries.  They had no flavor; she liked blackberries much better.  She had only tried the ones in the supermarket.  We made a date for me to introduce her to the real ones.  I made some wild raspberry muffins.

She really liked them, but I didn't bring enough.  The next time I brought more.  After that there were no more wild raspberries.  I tried it with commercial blueberries, but it's just not the same.  Since June she has been looking at me with sad puppy-dog eyes asking for more raspberry muffins.

I had an idea.  Maybe use pomegranate berries?   Maybe with some orange zest in the muffin batter?  Maybe a little apple pie spice?

I will have to see how that turns out.
Carpe digitus.
(Roughly translated, this is possibly the world's oldest "pull my finger" joke)

Calilasseia

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Re: raspberries etc.
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2019, 09:19:47 AM »
Next time they appear, save some for planting. Grow your own crop. :)
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yelnats

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Re: raspberries etc.
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2019, 10:44:17 PM »
Quote
This spring we had a bumper crop of wild raspberries.

I just realised that spring was six months ago for you. We're only just finishing spring.

a non-amos

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Re: raspberries etc.
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2019, 02:59:45 PM »
I will probably not save any for planting. 

I learned that this is actually an invasive species.  The native variety is far less productive and does not taste as good.  That means it's our civic duty to eat as many as we can in order to reduce the spread of invasive species.  Twist my arm.

This might be the first time that an invasive species helped the local ecology.  The bears love them, too.  Likewise many other critters.  What had been a famine is now a feast.

I don't need to worry much about planting them.  The birds to that.  On windshields, sidewalks, pedestrians, and on every square inch of viable soil.  It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven . . . but from the south end of northbound birds.

- A
Carpe digitus.
(Roughly translated, this is possibly the world's oldest "pull my finger" joke)