Author Topic: Word suggestion for Challenge puzzle 9 December (Australian time)  (Read 4327 times)

Dave

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It's been quite a while since I last made a suggestion, but I was horrified to discover that a fine English dialect word was not accepted, to wit, buttie. I remember being bombarded with this word in English TV shows like When the Boat Comes In, which had a strong regional emphasis (Tyneside). That invaluable publication the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (2007) not only records the word but also provides an illustrative quotation:

butty ˈbʌti noun 2. Also buttie. N. English. m19.
A slice of bread and butter; a sandwich.
I. Rankin The canteen did a fine bacon buttie.

Cheers,

Dave
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mkenuk

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Re: Word suggestion for Challenge puzzle 9 December (Australian time)
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2012, 06:29:26 PM »
I'd probably spell it 'butty' although I believe both forms do exist. I think it's from Merseyside rather than Tyneside (other side of the country). I grew up in the North-east and when I went to school I had sarnies (rather than butties) in my 'bait-tin' (lunchbox)
MK

Tom44

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Re: Word suggestion for Challenge puzzle 9 December (Australian time)
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2012, 02:07:59 PM »
As an American I never heard of it, but it does sound like classic English or Aussie slang.  If I had to guess at its meaning absent any clues I would like think it referred to someone acting like a goat in a fight and hitting someone else's forehead with one's own.
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ilandrah

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Re: Word suggestion for Challenge puzzle 9 December (Australian time)
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2012, 05:04:41 PM »
As an Australian it's a new one to me too.

ada

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Re: Word suggestion for Challenge puzzle 9 December (Australian time)
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2012, 06:53:25 PM »
Didn't they used to have chip butties in those old English TV shows?
I haven't heard of them for a while.  Chip buttie sounded divine, like
our old bread and dripping sandwiches.  All totally banned now, alas.
ADA
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Linda

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Re: Word suggestion for Challenge puzzle 9 December (Australian time)
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2012, 03:30:54 AM »
Still do have chip butties/sarnies, Ada, and they are delicious!

Alan W

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Re: Word suggestion for Challenge puzzle 9 December (Australian time)
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2017, 12:12:14 PM »
Continuing my effort to deal with some of the very old word requests:

From what I can see, the spelling butty - already allowed in Chi - is used more often. Nevertheless, buttie is used quite often too, and given as an alternate spelling in a few dictionaries, as in the entry you quoted, Dave. So buttie will be accepted in Chi too from now on.

We currently allow the plural butties, since it is not the simple appending of an S to the singular butty. I think we should keep that as it is, since both forms of the singular are rare, but the form ending in Y is somewhat more common.

Butties are not generally spoken about in Australia, but I was interested to see that both buttie and butty appear quite a few times in New Zealand newspapers. For example, a 2012 article in the Otago Times, referring to the then Prime Minister, John Key, mentioned "the bacon buttie he purchased from the Lake Hawea Netball Club". And a Bay of Plenty Times article from September this year was headed, "Bus users enjoy bacon butties for car free day". The NZ word for sandwich that I'd previously noticed was sammy or sammie.

Incidentally, butty has another set of meanings from the English mining industry. It can be a workmate; a middleman negotiating between miners and the mine owner; or an unpowered freight barge intended to be towed. The word was used in some of these senses by D H Lawrence in several of his novels and stories.
Alan Walker
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