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General Category => Words => Topic started by: Morbius on May 13, 2021, 07:12:42 AM

Title: Negatived?
Post by: Morbius on May 13, 2021, 07:12:42 AM
Negatived was the seed word in yesterday's Challenge puzzle.  I did eventually get it, after initially dismissing it as a non-word.  I can't say I've ever seen or heard it before.  I'm not even sure how you'd use it in a sentence.  Negative isn't a verb, is it?  It was played by fewer than half the players in that game, so I'd question whether it's a common form of the word.  It's certainly not common to me.
Title: Re: Negatived?
Post by: pat on May 13, 2021, 08:23:06 AM
I got negatived simply because I played negative and had the d left over so I gave it a try. I suspect a fair few others might have got it in the same way. According to Chi's own dictionary negative is indeed a verb, with four different meanings, but I agree it's not common. "I negatived it" just doesn't sound like something that anyone would say.
Title: Re: Negatived?
Post by: mkenuk on May 13, 2021, 08:27:22 AM
It's in COD as a verb, but like Pat, I would question its common status.
Title: Re: Negatived?
Post by: TRex on May 13, 2021, 10:23:49 AM
Add me to those doubting negatived is common.
Title: Re: Negatived?
Post by: les303 on May 13, 2021, 11:15:31 AM
Also a negative vote from me.
Title: Re: Negatived?
Post by: mkenuk on May 13, 2021, 11:24:11 AM
Sounds like yet another example of 'trendy business-speak'.

'We regret to inform you that your application has been negatived'.

I wonder if anyone ever uses the corresponding '-ing' form:

'They were in the process of negativing your suggestion when....'
Title: Re: Negatived?
Post by: juliea on May 14, 2021, 06:20:38 AM
That is very funny!!!
Title: Re: Negatived?
Post by: Alan W on August 19, 2021, 12:51:12 PM
Sounds like yet another example of 'trendy business-speak'.

In fact it seems to be mainly used by lawyers, especially in India.

From an Associated Press story in September 2020:

Quote
What came to be called the "flash of genius doctrine" resulted from a U.S. Supreme Court case called Cuno Engineering v. Automatic Devices (1941), and it was applied as a test for innovation until the Patent Act of 1952 declared that "patentability shall not be negatived by the manner in which the invention was made." In other words, to qualify as an invention, an innovation does not have to be extremely technical or impossible to understand for the average person.

And from the Indian News Nation site in November 2019:

Quote
Since coming into being in 1952, Rajya Sabha has passed 107 constitution amendment bills out of which one was negatived by Lok Sabha while four have lapsed on its dissolution, the Upper House Secretariat said.

We do allow negativing, but it is classed as a rare word. Negative is very infrequently used as a verb, so negatived will be treated as rare from now on.